Spinal fusion

Spinal Fusion

Spinal fusion is surgery to forever interface at least two vertebrae in your spine, wiping out movement between them.

Spinal fusion includes methods intended to impersonate the typical mending interaction of broken bones. During spinal fusion, your surgeon places bone or a bonelike material inside the space between two spinal vertebrae. Metal plates, screws and poles might be utilized to hold the vertebrae together, so they can mend into one strong unit.

Why Is Spinal Fusion Done?

Spinal fusion forever interfaces at least two vertebrae in your spine to improve strength, right a distortion or lessen pain. Your PCP may prescribe spinal fusion to treat:

  • Distortions of the spine

 Spinal fusion can help right spinal disfigurements, for example, a sideways bend of the spine (scoliosis).

  • Spinal shortcoming or flimsiness

 Your spine may get flimsy if there's unusual or extreme movement between two vertebrae. This is a typical symptom of serious arthritis in the spine. Spinal fusion can be utilized to reestablish spinal soundness in such cases.

  • Herniated plate

 Spinal fusion might be utilized to settle the spine after expulsion of a harmed (herniated) circle.

Dangerous Factors

Spinal fusion is by and large a protected method. However, similarly as with any surgery, spinal fusion conveys the likely danger of confusions.

Potential intricacies include:

  • Contamination
  • Helpless injury mending
  • Dying
  • Blood clumps
  • Injury to veins or nerves in and around the spine
  • Pain at the site from which the bone unite is taken

What Happens During Spinal Fusion?

Surgeons perform spinal fusion while you're under broad sedation so you're oblivious during the technique. Surgeons have built up an assortment of strategies for performing spinal fusion surgery. The procedure your surgeon utilizes relies upon the area of the vertebrae to be melded, the purpose behind the spinal fusion, and in certain examples, your overall wellbeing and body shape.

Description Percentage

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least 6 weeks during the past 12 months

60
Description Percentage

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least 4 weeks but less than 6 weeks during the past 12 months

40
Description Percentage

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least 2 weeks but less than  4 weeks during the past 12 months

20
Description Percentage

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least one week but less than 2 weeks during the past 12 months

10


Formula for Rating Intervertebral Disc Syndrome Based on Incapacitating Episodes

Need help with Medical Compensation? If your disability claim is not clearly supported by your medical records along with evidence, your claim can be denied. We have helped thousands of Veterans claim the compensation they deserve.

Get More Info