GENERAL RATING FORMULA FOR DISEASES OF THE EYE:

Diseases Of The Eye

The main sources of visual deficiency and low vision are basically age-related eye infections, for example, age-related macular degeneration, waterfall, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Other normal eye problems incorporate amblyopia and strabismus.

Refractive Errors

Refractive errors are the most successive eye issues. Refractive mistakes incorporate nearsightedness (myopia), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism (twisted vision at all distances), and presbyopia that happens between age 40–50 years (loss of the capacity to center very close, failure to peruse letters of the telephone directory, need to hold paper farther away to see unmistakably) can be adjusted by eyeglasses, contact focal points, or sometimes surgery.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration, frequently called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is an eye problem related with maturing and results in harming sharp and focal vision

Waterfall is an obfuscating of the eye's focal point and is the main source of visual impairment around the world, and the main source of vision misfortune. Waterfalls can happen at whatever stage in life due to an assortment of causes and can be available upon entering the world.

Other diseases related to eyes are:

  • Cataract

Cataract is an obfuscating of the eye's focal point and is the main source of visual deficiency around the world,

  • Diabetic Retinopathy

It is portrayed by reformist harm to the veins of the retina, the light-delicate tissue at the rear of the eye that is fundamental for acceptable vision

  • Glaucoma

Glaucoma happens when the typical liquid pressing factor inside the eyes gradually rises.

  • Amblyopia

Amblyopia is the clinical term utilized when the vision in one of the eyes is decreased in light of the fact that the eye and the mind are not cooperating appropriately

  • Strabismus

Strabismus includes an awkwardness in the situating of the two eyes. Strabismus is brought about by an absence of coordination between the eyes.

Keratopathy

Scleritis

Scleritis

The sclera is the protective outer layer of the eye, which is also the white part of the eye. It’s connected to muscles that help the eye move. About 83 percent of the eye surface is the sclera.

Scleritis is a disorder in which the sclera becomes severely inflamed and red. It can be very painful. Scleritis is believed to be the result of the body’s immune system overreacting. The type of scleritis you have depends on the location of the inflammation. Most people feel severe pain with the condition, but there are exceptions.

Causes

Scleritis is often linked with an autoimmune disease. Sometimes there is no known cause. Scleritis may be linked to:

  • joint swelling and stiffness (arthritis)
  • lupus, or other connective tissue disease
  • eye infection
  • inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Sjogren’s syndrome (causes very dry eyes and other symptoms)
  • granulomatosis
  • scleroderma
  • Scleritis may be caused by trauma (injury) to the eye. Rarely, it is caused by a fungus or a parasite.

Symptoms

Each type of scleritis has similar symptoms, and they can worsen if the condition isn’t treated. Severe eye pain that responds poorly to painkillers is the main symptom of scleritis. Eye movements are likely to make the pain worse. The pain may spread throughout the entire face, particularly on the side of the affected eye.

Other symptoms may include:

  • excessive tearing, or lacrimation
  • decreased vision
  • blurry vision
  • sensitivity to light, or photophobia
  • redness of the sclera, or white portion of your eye

The symptoms of posterior scleritis are not as evident because it does not cause the severe pain as other types. Symptoms include:

  • deep-seated headaches
  • pain caused by eye movement
  • eye irritation
  • double vision

Some people experience little to no pain from scleritis. This may be because they have:

  • a milder case
  • scleromalacia perforans, which is a rare complication of advanced rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
  • a history of using immunosuppressive medications (they prevent activity in the immune system) before symptoms began

Diagnosis

Your doctor will review a detailed medical history and perform an examination and laboratory evaluations to diagnose scleritis.

Your doctor may ask questions about your history of systemic conditions, such as whether you’ve had RA, Wegener’s granulomatosis, or IBD. They may also ask if you’ve had a history of trauma or surgery to the eye.

The following tests can help your doctor make a diagnosis:

  • ultrasonography to look for changes occurring in or around the sclera
  • complete blood count to check for signs of infection and immune system activity
  • a biopsy of your sclera, which involves removing tissue of the sclera so that it can be examined under a microscope

Retinopathy or maculopathy not otherwise specified

Intraocular hemorrhage

Detachment of retina

Evaluate on the basis of either visual impairment due to the particular condition or on incapacitating episodes, whichever results in a higher evaluation. With documented incapacitating episodes requiring 7 or more treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

With documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least 5 but less than 7 treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

With documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least 3 but less than 5 treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

With documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least 1 but less than 3 treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of three or more features or paired sets of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with six or more characteristics of disfigurement

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of two features or paired sets of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with four or five characteristics of disfigurement

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of one feature or paired set of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with two or three characteristics of disfigurement

With one characteristic of disfigurement

Note (1): The 8 characteristics of disfigurement, for purposes of evaluation under §4.118, are:

Scar 5 or more inches (13 or more cm.) in length. Scar at least one-quarter inch (0.6 cm.) wide at widest part.

Surface contour of scar elevated or depressed on palpation.

Scar adherent to underlying tissue.

Skin hypo-or hyper-pigmented in an area exceeding six square inches (39 sq. cm.).

Skin texture abnormal (irregular, atrophic, shiny, scaly, etc.) in

an area exceeding six square inches (39 sq. cm.).

Underlying soft tissue missing in an area exceeding six square inches (39 sq. cm.).

Skin indurated and inflexible in an area exceeding six square inches (39 sq. cm.).

 

Note (2): Rate tissue loss of the auricle under DC 6207 (loss of auricle) and anatomical loss of the eye under DC 6061 (anatomical loss of both eyes) or DC 6063 (anatomical loss of one eye), as appropriate.

Note (3): Take into consideration unretouched color photographs when evaluating under these criteria.

Note (4): Separately evaluate disabling effects other than disfigurement that are associated with individual scar(s) of the head, face, or neck, such as pain, instability, and residuals of associated muscle or nerve injury, under the appropriate diagnostic code(s) and apply § 4.25 to combine the evaluation(s) with the evaluation assigned under this diagnostic code.

Note (5): The characteristic(s) of disfigurement may be caused by one scar or by multiple scars; the characteristic(s) required to assign a particular evaluation need not be caused by a single scar in order to assign that evaluation.

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of three or more features or paired sets of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with six or more characteristics of disfigurement

Description Percentage

Evaluate on the basis of either visual impairment due to the particular condition or on incapacitating episodes, whichever results in a higher evaluation. With documented incapacitating episodes requiring 7 or more treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

60
Description Percentage

With documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least 5 but less than 7 treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

40
Description Percentage

With documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least 3 but less than 5 treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

20
Description Percentage

With documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least 1 but less than 3 treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months

10
Description Percentage

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of three or more features or paired sets of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with six or more characteristics of disfigurement

80
Description Percentage

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of two features or paired sets of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with four or five characteristics of disfigurement

50
Description Percentage

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of one feature or paired set of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with two or three characteristics of disfigurement

30
Description Percentage

With one characteristic of disfigurement

10
Description Percentage

With visible or palpable tissue loss and either gross distortion or asymmetry of three or more features or paired sets of features (nose, chin, forehead, eyes (including eyelids), ears (auricles), cheeks, lips), or; with six or more characteristics of disfigurement

80

Note (1): For the purposes of evaluation under 38 CFR 4.79, an incapacitating episode is an eye condition severe enough to require a clinic visit to a provider specifically for treatment purposes.

Note (2): Examples of treatment may include but are not limited to: Systemic immunosuppressants or biologic agents; intravitreal or periocular injections; laser treatments; or other surgical interventions

Note (3): For the purposes of evaluating visual impairment due to the particular condition, refer to 38 CFR 4.75-4.78 and to §4.79, diagnostic codes 6061-6091

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